A review of the Morso 1410 Squirrel wood burning stove

morso-squirrel-1410-wood-stove-2 Well, things finally came together and I’ve been burning in the Morso Squirrel for the past few nights.  The anticipation of finally firing her up has been killing me and I’m enjoying every minute of putting her through the paces.  After about 18 hours of burning I’m ready to share a few insights on this tiny workhorse.

With roughly a 15 inch x 15 inch footprint the Morso 1410 is  one of the smallest wood stoves I’ve seen.  The firebox is only big enough for 12 inch splits of wood, but you can cram a few 14 inch splits in on the diagonal.  Despite it’s diminutive size I have been able to get 8-9 hour burns when I pack her full of wood on a nice bed ofmorso-squirrel-1410-wood-stove-1 coals and nearly close the primary air supply.  I’ve found a few coals capable of restarting the fire even after 10 hours.

It takes a really good coal bed before the Squirrel starts burning efficiently and smokeless.  If I use a lot of dry kindling I can usually get to this point in about 10-15 minutes.  Yes I said smokeless.  This is an EPA certified stove, and when it is burning hot even the smoke is consumed inside the stove.  I couldn’t believe it the first time I checked the stove pipe outside and all I could see were heat waves rising into the cold morning air.

morso-squirrel-1410-wood-stove-3 When you are burning at an efficient temperature, for me this is around a 550 degree reading from the stove top, the Squirrel does a good job of conserving wood as well.  My method is to pack her full of wood and then burn that down to coals before I load her up again.  With the air supply half open that cycle takes about 2 and a half hours.

morso-squirrel-1410-wood-stove-5 When you tune your air supply properly you can get a great secondary burn with the Morso Squirrel.  You can see all the smoke and creosote burning in a ball of flame hovering above the fire.  What a show!

You build your fire on a nice grated surface and all the ash collects in a handy removable ash pan below.  There’s a neat little pull mechanism that makes the fire grate rotate so the ash is coaxed down into the pan.

morso-squirrel-1410-wood-stove-4 You can run your stove pipe through the top of the stove or through a connection in the back.  I chose the back so I had the entire stove top to use as a cooking surface.  I can’t wait to put a big Dutch oven full of stew on for a nice all day simmer.  It’s also a great spot for your kettle to put a bit of humidity back into the dry cabin air.

So far this stove has done a great job of heating my 900 square foot cabin in temperatures hovering around 25 degrees.  Within 10 feet of the stove you are toasty in short sleeves.  Within 20 feet you’re comfortable in a pullover.  Around 30 feet your standing in my fennel patch outside and probably freezing your arse off.

Here are a few more pictures of the Morso 1410 “Squirrel”:

Does anyone else have any experience with the Morso squirrel? Share your thoughts on this great little stove below.

 

36 thoughts on “A review of the Morso 1410 Squirrel wood burning stove

  1. My wife and I are remote AK residents and upgrading our stove situation as we transfer to full time cabin living. Your review if this stove is excellent. Now that you’ve used it for awhile, what is your assessment of it? Please share if you get a chance. thanks! jeigh

  2. I love my Morso Squirrel. She’s a workhorse. She’s quick to light and burns between 400F and 450F when using well seasoned wood. I’m sure my situation in North Mississippi is very different from yours in Alaska. We only have four months of potential temps in the low teens to deal with down here. For my 900 sq. ft. cabin the 1410 Squirrel is a perfect fit though.

    The only drawback to the Squirrel is the less than 12 inch splits you have to use. Even with the small fire box you can get an 8 hour overnight burn if you load her up and dial down the air flow. I use my 1410 as my cook top as well. I’d love to see some picks of your cabin or your area in Alaska. Cheers, braddock.

  3. Pingback: A Burning Question... | Rainier Yurts

  4. I paid $900 for mine 5 years ago. I ordered it through a regional fireplace store. I’ve seen them for cheaper on Ebay, but shipping is going to cost you a bundle…the ole girl ways a ton. Your best bet is the yellow pages and a local retailer.

  5. I am thinking about a Morso 1410 for my little house in Minneapolis. Total about 1000 sq ft. (Used to be about 550 sq ft, I’m remodeling/adding on…) Mostly I want a stove for ambience, and secondary warmth — winters here a person can use some extra heat & light.
    City folks tend to recommend gas, but I’d prefer wood, especially if it burns as clean as you describe, Braddock. Sounds like this little stove might be just the ticket. Glad to find this blog, as I may need some input in the next few weeks. Thanks!

  6. Wood heat is definitely the way to go Catherine. Having a few cords of well seasoned wood ready to fire my stove for battle with a long winter gives me a great feeling of satisfaction. The 1410 does burn clean…the first time you get a roaring fire going with good dry wood you’ll be amazed. I’m itching to have my first burn of the season. With overnight lows in the 40′s this weekend I think the time is right. If you go with the Morso and you have any questions just let me know. Thanks for commenting, I’m glad you found Outdoorblogging.

  7. Sorry, I don’t sell stoves. I can tell you I paid $900 for my Morso Squirrel a few years back. Your best bet is going to be a Google search or a check of the yellow pages for a local fireplace dealer. You might also look at the http://www.hearth.com forums and try to find someone who sells Morso products in your area. Good luck to you.

  8. I have check hearth.com, checked ebay and searched the internet for hours, only to find a dead link for Morsousa.com, whose president is or was Craig Shankster. Where exactly did you purchase yours and do they still carry the Morso 1410?

  9. I remember not being able to get to http://www.morsousa.com a few weeks ago. The site now redirects to http://www.morsona.com. This appears to be the new North American address of Morso’s website. Here’s a link that will take you to a list of all Morso’s dealers in the USA:

    http://www.morsona.com/Find-dealer-USA-2371.aspx

    Hearthlink International is one of their North American distributors (http://www.hearthlink.com/).

    I got my Morso 1410 from a dealer in North Alabama that isn’t even on this list, so there must be many other local dealers out there. I’d look in the phone book and call local fireplace stores if you don’t see your state in the list.

    I hope you find one. Winter is coming fast! I’ve been firing my Morso 1410 pretty regularly since last weekend…cooked a pot of chili on her Sunday too.

  10. I just got my “squirrel” and honestly am just loving it. I am going to try for an overnight burn as you had described.
    My mother has one and I have been dreaming of having one for my own home’s heat supply for a year now. Now that I finally am using her to heat my family’s 1100 sq ft home here in Colorado I am just so excited!
    I have two cords of wood blocked @ 10″ lengths that work perfectly and am hoping that, with its efficient burn, I can heat my home all winter!
    So hard to find used that I finally bit the bullet and bought a new unit

  11. Congratulations on your new “Squirrel”! There’s nothing like the radiant heat of a wood stove to keep you toasty all winter. I aim for 10″ splits when cutting my firewood too. It makes it so much easier to fully load the stove…that’s essential if you prefer waking up to a warm and comfortable cabin over a meat locker with an icicle on your nose.

  12. I am thinking of getting the 1410 for my 1000 sq ft home. I had a bigger stove in my previous house but it took up so much space and it got the house too hot. It was the same size house. I was wondering if I use double walled pipe out the back of the stove straight to outside how close could the stove be to a tiled wall?
    I am going to but it in a corner. There is a window that would be about 18-20″ away is that ok?

    Thanks so Much!

  13. The Morso 1410 Squirrel has very good heat shielding on the back, sides, and bottom of the stove. As you can see from my photos I did a corner installation with a window involved as well. The clearance from my double-walled stove pipe to bare sheet rock is 18″ straight into the corner and I have 14″ from the back corners of my stove to the side wall and window. Even at full blast, the window sill and sheet rock are never more than a couple of degrees warmer than room temperature. With a tiled wall and 18″ clearance I’d say you have a perfect place picked out for your stove. Here’s to many toasty nights!

    It’s going to be a cold night at the cabin…just about to fire the old girl up.

  14. From the photos on the Internet it appears the Morso squirrel 1410 has two air inlets on the door. One at the top above of the glass and one near the bottom next to the ash collection tray. How are these two air inlets used in conjunction with each other to control the fire?

    Thanks, Troy

    • In the US the bottom air intake is welded shut and isn’t even threaded to turn. That intake allows air flow bellow the grate and is designed for solid fuels like coal. Only Morso stoves sold in the UK are legal for burning anything other than wood. I believe this is an EPA restriction in the US. Of course what you do with your own stove is your business and responsibility. I find just pushing the door closed without latching it gives me a turbo blast of air to quickly light my fire and get the stove up to temp though. Once your coals are hot that added intake really isn’t necessary. Just be sure to close that latch before you go out playing in the snow.

  15. Braddock, I have enjoyed reading about your introduction to wood-burn stoves in general and Morso products in particular. I’m also thinking of installing a Morso Squirrel in my little cabin in northwest Connecticut, which is currently unwinterized and unheated. The Morso 1410 sounds like a great stove — my one concern is indeed that it might overheat the 15 x 12 foot room where I’d install it (the whole cabin is only 700 sq. ft. or so.) When your stove is burning, how close can you sit to it comfortably? Given the tight quarters, I’m wondering if it would make more sense for me to go with the Morso 1440, which the convection (vs. radiant) version. Any ideas? (Does anybody else have any experience with Morso convection stoves?)
    Keep warm, Mark

    • Mark, that radiant heat is what you’ll value most once you get your 1410. Nights spent cozzied up next to a radiant stove with a good book and a cup of tea are what cabins are there for. The first time you come in from chopping wood and feel that radiant heat hit your face through the glass as you warm your hands you’ll know you made the right decision. For your 700 sq. ft. I would think the “squirrel” will be perfect.

  16. I purchased a 1410 squirrel.i have it installed in a 20 x 40 garage .i have insulared the celing with r-19 the walls with r-5 the building itself does not hold heat well .if a gd hrard wood is used it will keep it warm.i modified bottom draft controll made it work.now burning coal aswell.nice stove clean burn.the fire box is small does not hold alot. 2 hrs hard burn it needs wood.if your house cabin is insulated I could see 5 hrs.I have a 118b jotul in my house its hard to fire first time heats 1300 sq ft easy can get hot at times open windows.moroso next size up I believe is badger.better to have small stove burn hard than a big stove an choke it down an cresote up.

    • I looked at the Morso Badger and Owl as well. I used your logic to make my decision on the Squirrel…better to be burning efficiently at full blast on a smaller stove than turning the intakes down and producing a ton of smoke on a larger model. This was the right choice for my 900 sq. ft. cabin. I really like the design of Jotul stoves. The long firebox model with the woodland reliefs on the side reminds me of the stove my dad had in his old hunting cabin.

    • Can you elaborate on how burning coal is better or worse. I am thinking about getting the coal version for my 850 square foot cabin that isn’t insulated. Do you think that the 1410 can handle it. Right now there is an old wood stove from 1925 that isn’t one bit airtight and it needs constant feeding. I thought the coal would yield more heat over a longer period of time during winter months. And short wood fires for those late fall early spring take the chill out moments.

      • I’ve never used a coal burning stove so I’m not going to be much help on that. I would be concerned about sustainability and interior air quality burning coal…just my personal opinion. Make sure you have a good carbon monoxide detector if you’re going to burn coal.

        • Make sure you have a good carbon monoxide detector if you burn wood!
          You’re still burning stuff, doesn’t matter what!

  17. I’ve had a Morso 2B Classic for several years are really like its looks and heating ability. However, from time to time, it will loudly belch out a puff of smoke from a small vent on the rear of the stove. The installation and chimney are fine, the house well vented, etc. No one I know has any idea why it does this, and I have found only one comment on the internet about this that went unanswered.
    Also, and perhaps related, this stove is supposed to have some fiberglass insulation placed over the baffle in the firebox. It did not take long for this to become filthy and unusable, so I run the stove without this insulation.
    Any ideas on the smoke puffs?

  18. just bought a floor model 1410. $821.00. Have it hooked up for my 860 sq. log cabin in Vt. Live here full time.Gets real cold in winter and high winds at 2800 ft. elevation. I am hoping the Morso will do the job. I fired it up and draft wasn’t that good but the temp outside was warm. I hope to get through winter with 3 cords of prime hardwood. Sure will beat 6 cords I am use to from the old stoves.

  19. We have an old Morso 2b classic, probably at least 40 years old, as our supplemental heat source. Due to the complexity of our house and the chosen location of the stove, in our entry way mud room, the stove pipe is about 30 feet long. Except for the first 10 feet, which is inside the house, the entire pipe is double-walled metalbestos.

    Our problem: After the stove cools down a little and the fire is minimal, our house becomes filled with backdraft aroma and sometimes unreasonable smoke. I’ve tried to seal all the joints, between panels, with stove cement but the problem persists. This is an older stove and not airtight, there is no gasket material around the door and no accommodation for it.

    Please, can anyone address our issue,
    Thanks!

  20. Looking into buying my first woodstove and really like what I’m reading about the Morso 1410 Squirrel. One thing I read that got my attention was that cast iron stoves are a higher risk for joint and seal failure when overfired (overheated) than steel stoves and product failure from overfiring nullifies the warranty on the failed parts. Because of this the author said one is better off with a steel stove which has less potential for product failure from overfiring. Any thoughts? Thanks.

  21. Morso did a “squirrel” thing with this unit: the name is applied to models which burn coal, wood and coal, and newer EPA wood only stoves. The external castings are pretty much identical, but the innerds are different. Mine is a coal burner but is rated for wood as well. As such, it does either ok but neither great.

    As mine is not the EPA wood-only version, it does have a working lower control. Neither of these units is truly airtight by any measure. I have used mine in northern NY for several years, burning both coal (anthracite ‘nut’) and wood.

    It will heat about 800sq ft of insulated space. With coal, it will burn to about 12 hours and that’s fully sloped. Wood will just not last more than a few hours (the EPA prohibits those slow smoldering fires that get you all night long). Coals in the morning? Yes, but real fire all night? No way.

    The riddling (rotating) grate is cute in a kinda European way, but it leaves a lot to be desired. This design leaves too much ash on the sides with wood and makes clinkers tough to clear with coal.

    They sometimes smokey smell? On mine, I can tell you for sure how it happens. Smoke has only entered the house through one of three mechanisms. First, on a cold start, there just isn’t enough draft and smoke and cold air pour down the chimney. Soln: open a window and shut the door to the room with the fire. That won’t happen again when the weather is cold and the chimney is warm, even if every bath and kitchen fan in the house are on. Second: freak winds blasting down the chimney. They are rare in most areas and a chimney cap will help. Finally, the most common cause of smokiness: puffing.

    Because this unit is so small, you have to fill it often. The cold wood cools down the tiny burn chamber and it doesn’t have the high temp gas burning that we need. Instead it burns smokey (inside) and then, as it approaches gas burning, it puffs explosively in fits and starts until it reaches that hot burn we want. This is made much worse with a chimney damper.

    Overall, it is a good unit provided you understand what you have. No unit is perfect and this is no exception. If coal is your interest, there are really better choices. If high(er) efficiency wood is you goal, I bet there are still better choices as the burn time is short and you can only use tiny pieces of wood. But if you want the option of either, the coal squirrel is about your only choice.

  22. I’m thinking of getting this stove as a second stove. We have a 1200 sq ft ranch and a hearthstone fireplace in the living room. Even with fans in the tops of the doorways, the bedrooms are freezing. Would this be a good little stove for that? We don’t have a very well insulated house either! Thanks in advance!

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